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Words With Friends (Candidates)

Please Think Before You Speak

Why don’t people think before they speak?  I mean really think about what they are saying and the meaning behind their words.   

If I had a dollar for every time I heard the following statements I could retire from recruiting tomorrow! So here’s some food for thought.  Let’s touch on some hot buttons.  Money.  Entitlement.  Appreciation.

I’m worth more money than I’m presently making.

I truly cringe every time I hear this one.  One cannot calculate one’s worth in dollars.  Think about this statement for a moment.  Is there really a monetary value high enough to assign to your time?  I think not.  This kind of statement also clouds a job seekers mind when trying to determine their desired salary requirements.  Your time is priceless so don’t “dollarize” yourself.  Most companies do not wait to meet their next new hire before they decide the salary range they will offer for the position.  It was on the books for that particular position long before they met you.  It’s not personal so take the feelings out of it.  It will make you a better negotiator with realistic expectations.

I need to make more money.

This is another interesting one.  Are you applying for a promotion at the U.S. Mint?  Are you making counterfeit bills in your basement?  Unless you answered yes to either of the preceding questions perhaps you should think about this a little differently.  A CFO who I had the pleasure of working with when I began my recruiting career said it best.  You make money with a printer, you earn money in your career.  Let’s refocus ourselves on earning money.  That’s why it’s called work.  You will not only get some personal satisfaction out of knowing that you have done a great job, you’ll earn the respect of your co-workers and employer, and you might just earn that raise you are seeking.   

I had 4 weeks’ vacation when I left my last job, I’m entitled to the same in my new job.

Another favorite, the entitlement attitude.  There are a few issues here.  Candidates – think about this for a moment.  Pretend you are the business owner hiring for a particular position.  Would you alter your company’s internal policies to satisfy a new employee’s desire to be out of work more frequently than members of your current team?  Would you consider hiring an individual who makes a career decision based on the number of days they can call out sick?  I wouldn’t.  Would you?  Why should your new employer do this for an unknown?  Work hard, earn their trust, then reap the benefits – in that order.

I have a degree.  Why doesn’t anyone understand how qualified I am to do this job?

I have this conversation with recent grads almost daily.  Yes, you have a degree.  Yes, you are anxious to begin your career.  Yes, you are smart and driven.  These qualities make you capable but not necessarily qualified for a given position.    Qualified is defined as fitted (as by training or experience) for a given purpose : competent.  Capable is defined as having the ability and attributes (physical or mental) or capacity for performance or accomplishment.  There is a huge difference between being capable of doing a job and being qualified for a job.  I know job hunting can be frustrating, especially in our current job market.  Recent Grads, please try to remain positive and keep this thought in mind.

My company needs to appreciate me and what I do for them.

Your company does appreciate you every time they hand you a paycheck.  Enough said.  

 

-- The moral of the blog is…It’s not personal.  None of this is personal so don’t make it or take it in a personal way.  This is about business and corporate structure.  That’s it.  Keep some of this in mind and you are less likely to have negative feelings about your present employer and your job search.

 

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